Tuesday, 23 August 2016

Immigrants to NB, NS, NF, QC pre-1810 (includes ships names)


Interesting to find that some early publications have references to Canada, which wasn't Canada at the time, but the 'Colonies' or 'British North America'. These particular entries that I have briefly transcribed (there is more information in the book), describe settlers in Halifax, New Brunswick, Newfoundland and Quebec between 1763 and 1810. Even though it says 'America' in the title, please don't disregard them if your ancestor settled in Canada. They are a valuable 'hidden' resource that deserve investigating further!

Title: Immigrants to America appearing in English Records by Frank Smith published in 1976 by The Everton Publishers, Inc.

Quotation: "There is no magic wand to the finding of a document within which appears the name and identify of a man or woman who was the first of that family to settle in the New World." [...] "The textbook series leading to an understanding of these sources is Genealogical Research in England and Wales." (David E. Gardner and Frank Smith: Genealogical Research in England and Wales Salt Lake City: Bookcraft Inc.,) p.1.

Introduction explains that these entries have been extracted from the Prerogative Court of (the Archbishop of) Canterbury PCC. These are now available online via some commercial sites such as Ancestry, Find My Past and Generations, to name a few. Use the 'card catalogue' option to specifically search the PCC collection.

Halifax (808) p.81 1805 MONCKTON, Hon. Cath. Eliz. (wife of Hon. Wm. Geo. M.), dau. of  George HANDFIELD, late of Halifax in America.

New Brunswick 11 p.2 1789 Nathaniel DICKENSON

Newfoundland (685) p.68 20 August 1763 SLATER, John (resides at Havannah) grandson of HAMILTON, Otho (resides at Nfld.)

Quebec (636) p.56 20 March 1810 COFFIN, Thomas Aston

St. John Co., New Brunswick (626) p.55 1795 WILLIAMS, Elijah of St. John co. and city of St. John New Brunswick, Esq. (formerly resident)


Names of Ships mentioned in this volume:

Bonny Bess, Concord, Desire, Dolphin, Eleanor, Elizabeth, Expedition, Feversham, Flower, Flower de Luce, Frederick, Friendship, Globb, Good Intent, Hope, Hopewell, John, Katherine, Le Honors Desire, Le Prince, Marmaduke, Mary Anne, Marygold, Mayflower, Merchant Delight, Norwich, Polly, Primrose, Rainbow, Recovery, Richard & Judith, Sally, Samuel, Sarah, Sir John, Speedwell, The Bear, The Peggy, The Plough, The Reformation, The Susannah, The Swallow, The Tryall, The London Merchant, The Marygold, Tristam & Jane, Whale, William & Francis, William & George, William & Mary College, Va, Woodhouse. 

Sunday, 21 August 2016

Twitter Treasures No. 4

My version of a Twitter bird
© Penny Allen
What I learned on Twitter this week.
14-21 Aug.2016 | Issue 4


I know, pretty old school, kind of like newspaper cuttings that libraries
used to do a long time ago.
But I just can't get over the feeling that I miss really neat things on Twitter. 
So every week or so I will share particularly Canadian content, but will bend the rules if it has a British spin, or an interesting immigrant story. 
My interpretation of the tweet or retweet is added.


publicdomainvectors. org
BC
Pacific Rim National Park Reserve tweeted about the Pinetree Line radar station, built during the Cold War. According to Bruce Forsyth's page, there were numerous 'Pinetree Lines' built across the country during the '50s for the purposes of an early warning system against suspected enemy attack. Forsyth took his information from Ren L’Ecuyer’s Pinetree Line web site.


MB
Tina Adcock tweeted a picture by the HBC Heritage of Letter Books housed in the Visual Vault at their archives in Winnipeg. An example of Letter books are 'copy books' of letters outward, 29 May 1680-5 July 1687. There is an interesting thesis on the Open Library by UBC student Elizabeth Mancke in 1984 that discusses 'Copy Books'. Title : The Hudson's Bay Company and the Management of Long-Distance Trade 1670-1730.

NU
https://archive.org/details/cihm_42416
James B. Bandow tweeted about the Government of Nunavut's agreement with the Canadian Museum of Nature in Ottawa. This agreement places Nunavut artefacts (140,000 items) in Ottawa for 5 years. Some of the artefacts include grave markers from Beechey Island for the last Franklin expedition. The  agreement indicates this is planned for 2017.

ON
Jewish Genealogical Society of Toronto tweeted an article from Torontoist.com about the history of Toronto street signs.

Chris Walters tweeted finding a maquette (a sculptor's small preliminary model or sketch) -in Algoma, ON- of General Wolfe's statue in London UK

Check out:

Tina Adcock tweeted about Maclean's Magazine providing its archives for free.

British and Canadian uniforms during the War of 1812. Carmen @ cdnhistorybits

Canada's History tweet is looking for submissions to it's Lost Stories Project. Do you have a family story that is unique and deserves to be told? Contact historylost@concordia.ca

Kathryn Lake Hogan tweeted a story from the Regina Leader Post about Elaine Ayre's discovery of her family's story from Norway to Iowa to Estevan, Saskatchewan through a family heirloom, an 1870 doll.  A book that Elaine self published in 2014, The Princess Doll's Scrapbook tells the story of her great-grandmother's journey to Canada. 

More Twitter Treasures No. 1, 2, 3

Introducing the Northern Rockies Museum of Culture and Heritage

It's such exciting news to hear about new museums being organized and developed. I happened across this announcement via Twitter a number of weeks ago, and was pleased to offer a piece on my blog for a guest article. Please take a moment to read through Madison's review about the efforts their volunteers have been undertaking for thirteen years! They plan to officially open in time for the 150th Canada celebrations in May 2017.  


A Labour of Love

   The Northern Rockies Museum of Culture and Heritage has been a vision of dedicated volunteers for many years and evolved into a labour of love. Thirteen years ago, the Hinton Railway Station, which had served the community since 1911, greeted the last passengers and closed its doors. The future of the building seemed uncertain. That was until a small group volunteers banded together to save the station for future generations.
  The town of Hinton, a small industry town nestled next to the Rocky Mountains of Alberta, has eagerly been awaiting the day the doors reopen on the historic Grand Trunk Pacific Railway Station House. In May of next year, the new museum will open to guests and inspire a love of history and culture of this area.
   As the building was on land owned by Canadian National Railways, it had to be moved to a new location. It just so happened there was an empty lot almost directly across the highway from its original location. A walkout basement was prepared on the new site, the building was jacked up and placed onto a truck to make its way across the highway.
   It was quite a day. Like all of Canada, the weather can change in an instant. The morning boasted clear skies and by the afternoon the town was hit with a snowstorm. However, this didn't faze the volunteers or the crew who would later have the Station sitting at its new home overlooking the Northern Rockies and the Athabasca river valley.
   Over the next thirteen years, the volunteers would for the most part, completely gut the building and refinish it into a usable community space. Hundreds of hours of work have led to the present. The redeveloped museum building now has its first full time employee and work is beginning on exhibits and programming. The museum's grand opening is set for May of 2017, to coincide with Canada's 150 celebrations.
   You can stay up-to-date with all of our exhibit planning, programming and events on any of our social media channels:
Twitter @NRMuseumCH
Facebook and Instagram @NorthernRockiesMuseum

Submitted by : Madison Sharman, Operations & Program Manager
Northern Rockies Museum of Culture & Heritage
780-801-2643
225 Gregg Avenue
Hinton, Alberta
T7V 2B7



Thursday, 18 August 2016

Canadian War Memorials in London

Canadian War Memorials in London are like the ethos of many Canadians, very unassuming. (Well, perhaps there is one exception.) This is a brief overview of some of the war memorials attributed to Canada and Canadians. Perhaps you may know of others?

Canada Gate which graces Green Park opposite Buckingham Palace is a beauty. The lovely gilded gates, on which provincial emblems face the Victoria statue, provides an impressive entrance to the park. The tourists love this photo opportunity, taking pictures of friends and family posing in front of the gate and then moving on, not having an inkling to what the gates represent. This brilliant memorial was presented to London in 1901, as a memorial to Queen Victoria. (Yes, does not really fit with the War Memorial theme of this article, but it is a Canadian memorial.)

Canada Gate © Penny Allen
Walk through the gates to a Canadian Memorial to the Second World War, simply called the Canada Memorial.  The memorial comprises of two granite blocks with many Canadian Maple Leaves etched into the stone. It has a waterfall feature and each piece is an inverted triangle shape. In between the two is a narrow path whose direction faces Halifax, the port where many WW2 soldiers left for the continent. This memorial was built in 1992, restorations began in 2004, and eventually was fully restored in 2011. The care and maintenance of the memorial falls under the responsibility of the Canadian Government. It is a beautiful and calming reflection of a chaotic time.

The first Canadian Wives’ Bureau offices were on Regent Street (situated in the Maple Leaf Club) in central London and it was here the war brides applied to emigrate to Canada. The Canadian War Brides page on Veterans' Affairs Government of Canada site gives additional information. This post I wrote gives some information about the brides of Canadian soldiers in the Second World War. British WWII Brides

At Regents Zoo, there's a lovely statue to commemorate Winnie the bear who was a pet of WW1 soldier Lieutenant Harry Coleburn (he lived in Winnipeg after the war) and also inspiration for A.A. Milne's Winnie the Pooh bear. Winnie was given to this London Zoo as Coleburn went to the front in 1914. At the end of the war, he decided to leave her with the people of London as she had become very popular with its citizens. Statue presented by the People of Manitoba.

Animals in War Memorial - Hyde Park - this memorial is to all animals who served in many wars, including both the World Wars. There was only one specific mention to a Canadian animal, 'Sergeant Gander' the Newfoundland Dog who served during WW2. This mention was left by a visitor (I'm assuming) and is a print out placed into a photo frame. It has been adorned with the Canadian flag. He was awarded the  Dickin Medal posthumously and there is an article on CBC's website about the memorial built in Newfoundland in July 2015 to honour Gander. Philip Doddridge, a soldier who fought with 'Sergeant Gander' attended.

Canada House © Penny Allen
Canada House located in Trafalgar Square, although built during 1824 and 1827 was bought in 1923 by the Government of Canada but not in use until 1925. During the Second World War, the building next door known as 2-4 Cockspur Street was used by the Canadian Army for their European Headquarters. This building has now been amalgamated into Canada House. Source : Wikipedia

'Canadian Few' RCAF Squadron airmen led by Captain McNab of Saskatchewan are mentioned on the Battle of Britain memorial on the Embankment close to Westminster. (Source: London Eh to Zed: 101 Discoveries for Canadian Visitors to London by Christopher Walters 978-1459729865).  Website London Eh to Zed

Upon visiting these memorials, one feels a deep sense of pride in Canada's contribution to the war effort. These are a few of the monuments that represent her soldiers sacrifices.  

Wednesday, 10 August 2016

Thames Iron Works, Royal Dockyard Officers and the Perkins Identification Albums

In my maritime meanderings, genealogy type questions arise such as: where and how to find images of ships, or my ancestor worked on the Thames, or at the Dockyards.

Often the most valuable references will not be found on the internet, but in a book. And often only in a special library. These 3 titles are ones I came across recently.  
River Thames
Thames River © Penny Allen

© Penny Allen
picture of the book cover
1.   British Warship Recognition: The Perkins Identification Albums Vol. I: Capital Ships 1895-1939 ISBN: 9781848323827
    This is a very new publication for Pen & Sword within their Seaforth maritime series. The images in the book are from the photo collections of Richard Perkins who donated his albums to the National Maritime Museum. Before publication, these images were accessible only by appointment at the National Maritime Museum.
    Another book, Volume II (ISBN 9781848323865) of this title is set to be published very soon.
                    Never before published!

2.    Royal Dockyards Officers List - I heard about this list from another researcher. It was compiled by a 'Commander May' from National Archives resources. This Dockyards Research Guide at the National Maritime Museum explains that 'In the 17th and 18th centuries there were six Royal Navy dockyards in England, at Deptford, Woolwich, Chatham, Sheerness, Portsmouth and Plymouth. There were also a number of outports in England and overseas yards, including Gibraltar, Halifax and Jamaica.' (Enquire at the National Maritime Museum)

3.    The Thames Iron Works 1837-1912 : A Major Shipbuilder on the Thames by Daniel Harrison ISBN: 9781907586347

© Penny Allen
picture of the book cover
    The introduction explains that the book particularly outlines the details of the archaeological dig and the operations of the company. However, Mr. Harrison also notes that the shipyard 'reflects industrial and economic trends of both London and the nation during the period from the 1830s to the first decade of the 20th century'.(p.3)
    Some of the resources used are: Thames Iron Works Gazette (TIWG) (a periodical produced by the company) and an historical catalogue produced when the Thames Iron Works had a display at the Crystal Palace Exhibition in London in 1911. It is available at the Science Museum. 
    There are very few references to names of staff, and I didn't see an obvious listing of employees or an indication of where to look for staff records. 
    Perhaps they are hidden amongst the Thames Iron Works Gazette (TIWG) and only need to be indexed by an enthusiastic volunteer! 
    The Museum of the Docklands and the Greenwich Heritage Centre would also be a research library that may have further information.  

If you have any further information, or know of a resource for finding staff records, please leave a comment. 

Sunday, 7 August 2016

A London cemetery: BLUMBERG, O'BRIEN and PERRY Families

Are these your ancestors? During my visit to Kensal Green Cemetery in London, I came across two notices. They are notifications of conservation work to some of the monuments in the cemetery which have been listed as heritage buildings. The General Cemetery Company has stated that they attempted to contact the families, but are hoping to find out more information, and are appealing to the public for help.

If you can help, please get in touch. The Friends of Kensal Green Cemetery;  c/o The General Cemetery Company;  London W10 4RA UK
Messages & enquiries 07530 676151 (mobile) or fokgc@hotmail.com   

An investigation on the families leads to a little bit more information . . .

General James PERRY and Sir Patrick O'BRIEN

The inscription over the door:
"To the dear loved memory of Sir Patrick O'Brien Bart. M.P. for King's County 1852-1885 D.L. for the City of Dublin JP of King's County who died April 25th 1895. This chapel has been altered and elaborated by his ever sorrowing wife Ida O'Brien RIP."

An obituary in the International Catholic News Weekly:
"The death of SIR PATRICK O'BRIEN, BART., on April 25, is announced. The deceased Baronet was the eldest son of the late Sir Timothy O'Brien, Bart. When the Corporation of Dublin was reformed in 1840, Daniel O'Connell was elected the first Catholic Chief Magistrate of the City since the penal times. Sir Timothy O'Brien was the second, and he was again subsequently elected when it became known that the Queen was to pay her first visit to Ireland. It was on this occasion, 1849, that the honour of a Baronetcy was conferred. He had then been member for Cashel since 1845 and continued such till 1857."

"Sir Patrick was born in 1823, and educated at Trinity College, Dublin, was called-to the Bar in 1844, and elected member for the King's County in 1852. He was 30 years in Parliament. He is succeeded in the title and estate by the well-known cricketer, Mr. Timothy Carew O'Brien, eldest child of the deceased Baronet's second brother Timothy, who married in 1860, Mary, only daughter of the late Mr. Carew O'Dwyer of Orlagh, co. Dublin. The Requiem Mass was celebrated on Thursday May 2, at St. Mary Magdalene's, Brighton, and the interment took place at Kensal Green Cemetery. R.I.P."

**From the Peerage website:
Sir Patrick O'BRIEN, 2nd Bt. M, #543446, b. 1823, d. 25 April 18951
He was the son of Sir Timothy O'Brien, 1st Bt. and CatherineMurphy
He married Ida Sophia Parlby, daughter of Commander James Parlby, on 29 August 1866.1
He died on 25 April 1895, without issue.
     He graduated with a Master of Arts (M.A.) He was a practising barrister. He held the office of Member of Parliament (M.P.) for King's County between 1852 and 1885. He held the office of Justice of the Peace (J.P.) He held the office of Deputy Lieutenant (D.L.) He succeeded to the title of 2nd Baronet O'Brien, of Merrion Square, Dublin and Borris-in-Ossory, Queen's County [U.K., 1849] on 3 December 1862.

Ida Sophia PARLBY was the daughter of Commander James PARLBY. F, #543447, d. 12 May 1910
She married, firstly, Lt.-Gen. James PERRY before 1866.1
She married, secondly, Sir Patrick O'BRIEN, 2nd Bt., son of Sir Timothy O'BRIEN, 1st Bt. and Catherine MURPHY, on 29 August 1866.

Please contact me if you'd like to have your contact details added to this article. 
Citations:
[S37] BP2003 volume 2, page 2965. See link for full details for this source. Hereinafter cited as. 
[S37]  Mosley, Charles, editor. Burke's Peerage, Baronetage & Knightage, 107th edition, 3 volumes. Wilmington, Delaware, U.S.A.: Burke's Peerage (Genealogical Books) Ltd, 2003.

**From the Gazette:
Major Thomas Sweet, Madras Staff Corps, to rank as Major from 11th March 1863, in succession to Lieutenant-General J. PERRY, Madras Infantry, deceased.

Notice of Intention to Carry Out Works to This Monument at Kensal Green Cemetery.
      English Heritage commissioned a professional condition survey from Odgers Conservation Ltd in 2013 for this and a number of other monuments in the cemetery. This report includes recommended repairs and an indication of cost.
     The General Cemetery Company is now looking to ensure that the necessary conservation works are carried out in line with the report prepared by Odgers. We are working with English Heritage to arrest the decline of this monument and, ideally, to restore it.
      Letters have been sent to the last recorded owner who have legal responsibility for any works undertaken seeking written permission to carry out these works. This notice is part of that process and if contact cannot be made with a current owner The General Cemetery is seeking to make contact with any person who is an heir, executor or who has a family connection with the grave.
     According to our records, General James Perry and Sir Patrick O'Brien were interred in this Mausoleum in 1863 and 1895 respectively.
     We very much hope that you will engage with this project, and see the significant monument to General James Perry and Sir Patrick O'Brien conserved for future generations.
     It is now a Grade II Listed Building in recognition of its architectural and historic importance. It holds a key position in the historic core of this pre-eminent cemetery.
    The mausoleum consists of a chapel with a pitched roof and gabled ends with a door at one end and window to the other. Unfortunately, after years of neglect, this monument is now on the English Heritage Heritage at Risk Register. There are particular concerns about the poor condition of the roof, the covering is missing which has allowed water to damage the stonework and interior and there is some settlement movement.

The Blumberg Family
I was able to find some information on Rootsweb with a possible link to the family:
BLUMBERG, Ludwig Alexander b: ABT 1803 d: 1857 in All Souls, Kensal Green, Kensington, Middlesex, England
BLUMBERG, Nellie Jane b: 5 JAN 1872 in St Luke, Paddington, London, England d: 12 MAR 1872 in All Souls, Kensal Green, Kensington, Middlesex, England

david@highlandnoke.co.ukGardiner Family Tree - posted quite a bit of information which was last updated Jan.2016



Notice of Intention to Carry Out Works to This Monument at Kensal Green Cemetery.
      English Heritage commissioned a professional condition survey from Odgers Conservation Ltd in 2013 for this and a number of other monuments in the cemetery. This report includes recommended repairs and an indication of cost.
     The General Cemetery Company is now looking to ensure that the necessary conservation works are carried out in line with the report prepared by Odgers. We are working with English Heritage to arrest the decline of this monument and, ideally, to restore it.
      Letters have been sent to the last recorder owner who have legal responsibility for any works undertaken seeking written permission to carry out these works. This notice is part of that process and if contact cannot be made with a current owner The General Cemetery is seeking to make contact with any person who is an heir, executor or who has a family connection with the grave.
     According to our records, The Blumberg Family were interred in this Mausoleum in 1857.
     It is now a Grade II Listed Building in recognition of its architectural and historic importance. It holds a key position in the historic core of this pre-eminent cemetery.
     We very much hope that you will engage with this project, and see the significant monument to The Blumberg Family conserved for future generations.

If you know of these families and are able to provide information, please contact The General Cemetery Company at:  fokgc@hotmail.com 

My original post on Canadian Military Graves in Kensall Green Cemetery.